Biography of the Leading Personalities of the British Imperial Political Elite Establishment, Presiding Over the Decolonisation Policy of the British Empire, and its Wider Implications

Biography of the Leading Personalities of the British Imperial Political Elite Establishment, Presiding Over the Decolonisation Policy of the British Empire, and its Wider Implications

  1. Conservative Party

Churchill, Winston L.S. Prime Minister 1940-45 October 1951-April, 1955.

In 1900 Churchill was elected to parliament as a Conservative. By the time Churchill had become thirty-two he had switched from Conservative to Liberal. In 1905 he was appointed Under Secretary of State for the Colonies in Campbell-Bannerman’s Liberal Government. At the age of thirty-six Churchill had a post in the Cabinet as President of the Board of Trade. Two years later, in 1910, he became the Home Secretary; First Lord of the Admiralty in 1911, and Minister of Munitions in 1917. By the outbreak of the First World War, Churchill was one of the four most influential members of the Cabinet along with Asquith, Lloyd-George and Grey. In the next Election of 1922, he lost his seat in Parliament. In 1924 Churchill reappeared in parliament as a Conservative and as the Chancellor of the Exchequer until 1929. Throughout the following decade as a result of his simple conviction that India would never be fit to govern itself, Churchill’s vigorously opposed the National Government over India. Churchill’s belief was also that, should India receive its independence, the British Empire would be under-mined, which in the end caused him to resign from the Shadow Cabinet after the fall of Baldwin’s Government in 1929. This was a result of his strong advocacy of unpopular policies, and being out of tune with his own party even other issues, such as his passionate pleas for British rearmament which were viewed as ridiculous and alarmist, and over the king’s abdication. Consequently Churchill was out of office for ten years and many people thought that, at the age of sixty-five, his Ministerial concern was over.

However, had it not been for the outbreak of the Second World War, which therefore made his warning of the German Aggression justified and lifted his reputation to a higher point than ever before, Churchill would never have led Britain as a Prime Minister. In due course during the War, however, because of the economic crisis that the War had inflicted on Britain and due to India’s reluctance to send more men to fight the Japanese, as a result of her demand for independence Churchill in 1942 reluctantly sent the Simon Commission to discuss preparation for granting of full nationhood with the Indian leaders. Churchill’s War efforts which led to the survival of Britain and of Western freedom have made him the greatest Englishman of the twentieth century. He is often compared with the greatest world figures in history, all as a result of five years out of ninety.

Douglas-Home, Alec F. Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs 1960-63 (Prime Minister, 1963-64).

Soon after Oxford, Douglas-Home was a Conservative member of   Parliament and PP to Neville Chamberlain. In 1955-60 he was Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations and from 1957 onwards he was Leader of the House of Lords too. When Alec Douglas-Home was appointed Foreign Secretary in the Summer of 1960, there was general ignorance in even the will informed Press about his capacities, yet he had already been Leader of the House of Lords for three years.

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