The British Conservative Government’s Political Elite, and the European Union: Safeguarding British Interests (With Special Reference to: 2010 – 2016)

The British Conservative Government’s Political Elite, and the European Union: Safeguarding British Interests (With Special Reference to: 2010 – 2016)

Conclusion:
Therefore, it could be said that Winston Churchill, the Conservative political elite of the WWII, and the Prime Minister of the then, war time coalition government talked of a united Europe after the War, which became one of the pillars of British foreign policy. Meaning from the British point of view, industrial, financial and economic co-operation. Now, at the first half of the twenty first century things have come to ahead. Over the most important issue, i.e. money. This means banking, and financial policies, in conflict between the United Kingdom, and the rest of the Union, specially, the Euro-zone. This led to dissatisfaction among some quarters of the Conservative Party. To quash this dissolution among certain parts of the Conservative Party, which led to the creation of UKIP, the Government of the Conservative Prime Minister, David Cameron, decided to put the matter to a referendum. In other words, national interests, over domestic politics became a bargaining chip.

Notes:
1. J. Blondel. Voters, Paties and Leaders. (Londen: Penguin, 1963), p.21.
2. ibid., p.22.
3. ibid., p.23.
4. ibid.
5. ibid., p.26.
6. ibid.
7. ibid., p.41.
8. ibid, p.239.
9. ibid., p243.
10. J. SCOOT, The Upper Classes, Property and Privilege in Britain. (London: McMillan, 1992), P.166.
11. J. BLONDEL, op. cit., p.44.
12. J. SCOTT, op. cit., p.158.
13. J. BLONDEL, op. cit., p.42.
14. J. SCOTT, op. cit., p.149.
15. ibid., p.178.
16. W.L. GUTTSMAN, The British Political Elite. (London: McGibbon & Kee, 1963), p.75.
17. J. SCOTT, op. cit., pp.96-97.
18. ibid., p.97.
19. ibid., p.98.
20. ibid., p.102.
21. ibid., p.104.
22. ibid., p.133.
23. ibid., p.135.
24. ibid., p.138.
25. ibid., pp.138-139.
26. M.BELOFF and G.PEELE, The Government of the United Kingdom. (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson,1980), p.154.
27. ibid.
28. A delegate to the 1949 Conservative Conference: Conference Report, p. 53
29. D. Goldsworthy, Colonial Issues in British Politics 1945-1961. (London: Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1971), p. 167.
30. S. E. FINER, Comparative Government, (Middlesex: Penguin, 1970),
31. P. 132.
32. G. A. JONES, The Political Structure, (London: Longmans, 1969).
33. p. 54.
34. ibid.
35. ibid., pp. 54-55
36. ibid.,p.53.
37. S. E. FINER, op. cit., p. 151.
38. ibid., pp. 169-170.
39. ibid., p. 174.
40. ibid.
41. G. A. Jones, op. cit., p. 55.
42. M. BELOFF, The Future of British Foreign Policy. (London: Secker and Warburg, 1969), p. 110.
43. R. RHODES- JAMES (ed.), op. cit., pp. 914-915.
44. ibid.
45. M. Camps, Britain, and the European Union, (California University, Berkeley, 2015), p. 72.
46. Britain, Europe, and the City of London. Can the Triangle be Managed? Centre for European Reform. P. Whyte, www.cer.org.uk.
47. J.A. Usher, European Union: Structure, Enlargement, and Economic Union, (London: Longman, 2013). P. 174-176.

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